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Nov
16

Do anti-depressants make you more outgoing and do they help for social anxiety?

By

If you have ever taken or known somebody who has taken anti-depressants what was your experience?

1) Did they work
2) Do you have to take them forever
3) If you no longer feel like socializing does it help this problem
4 Looking at my situation do you think they would help me?

All of my life I’ve been depressed more often than not. I just started university and although I’m interested in what I’m doing I find my self skipping classes and not having the motivation to go. I’ve withdrawn from a lot of my friends and am always inventing excuses not go hang out because i feel like in my current state i would not be much fun. At work I’m very anti-social i just do my work don’t make small talk and than go home. The worst part is that I know that this is not me, in high school and college I was very social in spite of my depression i was still able to maintain a very good social life. I feel as if I’m ruining my life by being so withdrawn… I have also become very mistrusting of people and tend to resent everybody for no reason…

Another problem I have is social anxiety is their a medication that works for both depression and social anxiety?

I have been on anti-depressants most of my life now so I’ll tell you directly from my experience.

It sounds like you have a lot of the same issues I have with the social anxiety and stuff and the simple answer is YES, anti-depressants (or some other form of medication) can help tremendously!

The drugs themselves don’t MAKE you more social… but when you’re happier, you tend to want to be around people more and that’s what helps. Some organizations that prescribe meds even have events and activities planned every once in a while or a couple times a week because there are a lot more of "us" than people think. It really helps when you know other people are dealing with the same things you are.

The hardest part is finding what’s right for you, a dose that works, or even a combination of drugs that works right.
That is the absolute worst part of it. When they/you do find the right combination though, it’s almost like a miracle. When you can’t feel anything different (aka-you don’t feel like you’re on drugs) and you feel social and happy and energetic again, like you used to. Then you’ve found it.

Head Meds (as I affectionately call them) are NOT supposed to make you feel different. They aren’t "happy pills" or "downers" or whatever people use them illegally for. They’re just supposed to get the chemicals back into balance or make sure they stay balanced – so you can feel like the person you are.

Anyone who has experience with depression or anxiety or any other mental illness like that knows what I mean.

As for whether or not you have to stay on them forever… I do. I was in a car accident when I was 17 and I had a head injury. I’m also bi-polar. It differs from person to person. Most people are on them short-term, others longer. Either way, I wish you luck, and I hope you get a good doctor who can help you.

Categories : anxiety treatment

3 Comments

1

1. It’s possible the anti depressants can help you feel like you’re more relaxed in yourself because you may not feel so heavy hearted. These meds vary from person to person, however. What’s good for one person may be awful for another. I tried one and it made my depression even worse! Then another and felt like it saved my life. A medical doctor can prescribe what’s best and monitor you to find your way. It takes a doctor no matter what…you’re worth it so just do this one thing for yourself & you’ll thank yourself for it. This is, after all, your only life, right?
2. I took them for two years. I just knew when it felt right to stop & that’s when I did. There are different kinds of depression, however (again, the doctor…well, you know)
3. When you feel like smiling…notice how nice it is to be alive…smell the air..little values then you may find yourself also smiling at others, noticing how special they are because you’re less focused on your self (you’re feeling better) and have room for others in your life. Feeling better about myself always helps me feel generous towards making others feel good, too.
4. I think most universities offer some free counseling and perhaps you could go there first. The hardest part is to get your happy tail over there. Everything is so much harder when we’re depressed. Just do that one thing first…one foot in front of the other…and you’ll get there. Never give up…you’ll miss the miracle! Blessings for you now & forever.
References :
Years of experience. Thanks for allowing me to share.

2

From Y!A:
In my journalistic research I interviewed with the friends and relatives of those people who give positive feedbacks regarding antidepressants. They told me that their antidepressant using friends (or relatives) were very nice, caring and thoughtful people at those times they had depression but after they had started to take antidepressants they observed sharp character changes in them. They say that their friends have become self-centered, reckless and very nervous people after starting to use antidepressants despite feeling themselves great (they often say that their friends were much nicer people when they had depression. This suggests that antidepressant users experience a kind of social alienation due to the sharp changes in their characters caused by the emotion blunting effects of antidepressants and the eventual impact of this on their friends). Some other friends of these people told me that their friends had developed very irritating habits such as chewing tobaco as well (later I realized that those people were not chewing tobacco really. They were rather suffering from an irreversable neurological disease called dyskinesia which leads to uncontrolable body movements including chewing). ~~~

View: MEDICATION & DEPRESSION, at http://your-mental-health.weebly.com/3.html then the rest, and see page B. Social anxiety; see pages 1, & E. Note: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/05/08/robert-whitaker-interview.aspx Social withdrawal is a symptom of depression, perhaps returning, or developing into major depression. It’s alright to OCCASIONALLY tell a close friend that you are feeling down at the moment, and ask if it happens to them, and what do they do about it. Professional advice is to go out with friends regularly, even if you don’t feel like it much. In "Feeling Good – the new mood therapy" by David D. Burns, M.D., from your bookstore, or Amazon.com, he recommends that you estimate beforehand how pleasureable it will be, out of 10. Then, some few hours after returning, rate the actual event. Keep a journal for this, and the other things he advises, and examine your progress.

A previous answer: Use the effective natural core treatments for depression at * http://your-mental-health.8m.com/blank_27.html and page B. If using a RECOMMENDED* brand of St. John’s Wort, take with meals to avoid possible stomach upsets; check out the websites on St. John’s Wort via page B, and if using UP TO 50mg of 5-htp daily in addition (or UP TO 200mg of 5-htp if NOT using the wort) take with a very low protein meal, to maximise the amount crossing the blood/brain barrier, with no, or extremely little protein 2 hrs before, to 2 hrs afterwards. Alternatively, take SAMe with the core treatments, but don’t use anything else. View http://www.typeofdepression.org/Cause-Of-Depression.htm & http://curetogether.com/depression/ig/treatment-effectiveness-vs-popularity
References :

3

I have been on anti-depressants most of my life now so I’ll tell you directly from my experience.

It sounds like you have a lot of the same issues I have with the social anxiety and stuff and the simple answer is YES, anti-depressants (or some other form of medication) can help tremendously!

The drugs themselves don’t MAKE you more social… but when you’re happier, you tend to want to be around people more and that’s what helps. Some organizations that prescribe meds even have events and activities planned every once in a while or a couple times a week because there are a lot more of "us" than people think. It really helps when you know other people are dealing with the same things you are.

The hardest part is finding what’s right for you, a dose that works, or even a combination of drugs that works right.
That is the absolute worst part of it. When they/you do find the right combination though, it’s almost like a miracle. When you can’t feel anything different (aka-you don’t feel like you’re on drugs) and you feel social and happy and energetic again, like you used to. Then you’ve found it.

Head Meds (as I affectionately call them) are NOT supposed to make you feel different. They aren’t "happy pills" or "downers" or whatever people use them illegally for. They’re just supposed to get the chemicals back into balance or make sure they stay balanced – so you can feel like the person you are.

Anyone who has experience with depression or anxiety or any other mental illness like that knows what I mean.

As for whether or not you have to stay on them forever… I do. I was in a car accident when I was 17 and I had a head injury. I’m also bi-polar. It differs from person to person. Most people are on them short-term, others longer. Either way, I wish you luck, and I hope you get a good doctor who can help you.
References :
Experience

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